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GENEVA (Reuters) – Reuters photographer Denis Balibouse spent years shooting fast-moving subjects in fast-breaking events – the winning goal in a Europa League soccer clash, the confrontation in an Extinction Rebellion street protest. A handout picture of the Aletsch Glacier in Fieschertal, Switzerland taken between 1860 and 1890 and released by Library of Congress, is
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French propulsion startup ThrustMe unexpectedly made it into orbit early this month with its innovative propulsion system placed aboard a Chinese cubesat. Dianfeng, or Xiaoxiang-1 (08), a six-unit cubesat developed by privately owned Spacety, was a secondary payload on the launch of the Gaofen-7 civilian Earth observation satellite Nov. 2, along with a first satellite
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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Using a bright orange electrocardiogram machine attached with suction cups to the body of a blue whale, scientists for the first time have measured the heart rate of the world’s largest creature and came away with insight about the renowned behemoth’s physiology. Researchers from Stanford University’s Goldbogen Lab, Cascadia Research, Scripps Institution
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There is no human mom in this world who would say giving birth is easy peasy. But there are some mothers out there in the animal kingdom who go through the extreme to give birth to their offsprings. Here is why mothers all around the earth deserve more than a thank you. Science Insider tells
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We are going to the Moon, to stay, by 2024. And this is how. Special thanks to William Shatner for lending his voice to this project. About NASA’s Moon to Mars plans: https://www.nasa.gov/specials/moon2mars/ Credit: NASA This video is available for download from NASA’s Image and Video Library: https://images.nasa.gov/details-NHQ_2019_0514_WeAreGoing.html
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#HowItsMade Mondays 9/8c on Science 87% of Americans have ice cream in their freezer at any given time. Chocolate syrup is the world’s most popular ice cream topping. Full episodes streaming FREE on Science GO! https://www.sciencechannelgo.com/how-its-made/ More How It’s Made: http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Water vapour over the continental United States is shown in this satellite image from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Credit: NOAA/GOES Meteorologists are worried about a ruling last week that means 5G signals could
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Apple has released its annual holiday ad, just in time for Thanksgiving. Named “The Surprise,” the ad focuses on two young girls who spends a lot of time playing with an iPad. The ad focuses on a family that travels across the country to visit the mother’s father. Like many families, the parents hand them
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#HowItsMade Mondays 9/8c on Science Candy canes are delicious holiday treats that come in all shapes and sizes. See the carefully choreographed production process in action! Full episodes streaming FREE on Science GO! https://www.sciencechannelgo.com/how-its-made/ More How It’s Made: http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/how-its-made/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience Check out SCI2 for infinitely awesome science videos. Every day. http://bit.ly/SCI2YT
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Every year, 5 million Americans have their wisdom teeth removed. These pesky molars can cause infections tooth decay, and even tumors. The problem? Wisdom teeth often can’t fit in our mouths. But that wasn’t always the case. Early human ancestors used these teeth to grind up tough, uncooked food. —————————————————— #WisdomTeeth #ToothDecay Science Insider tells
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An international team of scientists, led by the University of Manchester, has developed a metal-organic framework, or MOF, material that provides a selective, fully reversible and repeatable capability to capture a toxic air pollutant, nitrogen dioxide, produced by combusting diesel and other fossil fuels. The material then requires only water and air to convert the
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The super-photon team. Courtesy (c) Photo: Volker Lannert/Uni Bonn Researchers at the universities of Bonn and Cologne in Germany have developed a new way of splitting photon wavepackets that involves cooling them down to a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) in a double-ridge microresonator structure. This thermodynamic method differs from the usual optical beam-splitting techniques because it
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WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Genetic material extracted from a 1.9 million-year-old fossil tooth from southern China shows that the world’s largest-known ape – an extinct creature dubbed “Giganto” that once inhabited Southeast Asia – was an oversized cousin of today’s orangutans. A fossil of a lower jaw of the large extinct ape Gigantopithecus blacki, found in
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MACHINES: HOW THEY WORK Thursdays 10/9c on Science This machine can decipher coins with pinpoint accuracy. Light sensors measure the size while electromagnets detect the metal type of the coin. More Machines! http://www.sciencechannel.com/tv-shows/machines-how-they-work/ Full episodes streaming FREE on Science GO: https://www.sciencechannelgo.com/machines-how-they-work/ Subscribe to Science Channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeScience
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“What’s it like to see something that no one has seen before?” I asked Tatiana Latychevskaia, a physicist at the University of Zurich. “You’re always puzzled, trying to look for something similar,” she says. She explains that you talk to colleagues, search the literature, and think back to conference presentations… Usually, you don’t know in
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Comedian Sacha Baron Cohen has waded into the debate about social media regulation. In an award-acceptance speech to the Anti-Defamation League yesterday, the creator of Ali G and Borat delivered a precision take-down of what he called Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s “bullshit” arguments against regulating his platform. The speech is well worth watching in full
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TOKYO (Reuters) – Few aspects of life escape the touch of high tech in cutting-edge Japan, including an official song written to welcome Pope Francis when he visits Japan from Saturday. Written by Jun Inoue, the song, “Protect all Life – The Signs of the Times”, is based on the theme of the pope’s Japan
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This year’s Nikon Small World Motion Photomicrography Competition has given us a fascinating glimpse into the realm of the extremely tiny. Watch a flea giving birth and a zebrafish embryo developing its complex nervous system. And that’s just the start. Learn more about this year’s submissions: https://globenewswire.com/news-release/2018/09/27/1577365/0/en/Developing-Sensory-Nervous-System-of-a-Zebrafish-Wins-2018-Nikon-Small-World-in-Motion-Competition.html Check out the gallery page: https://www.nikonsmallworld.com/galleries/2018-small-world-in-motion-competition —————————————————— Science
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We’ve taken giant leaps and left our mark in the heavens. Now we’re building the next chapter, returning to the Moon to stay, and preparing to go beyond. We are NASA – and after 60 years, we’re just getting started. Special thanks to Mike Rowe for the voiceover work. This video is available for download
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NASA denied that there are living “insect- and reptile-like creatures” on Mars, after a professor at Ohio University made the controversial claim earlier this week. Alana Johnson, NASA’s Public Affairs Officer, told Fox News in a statement that the collective general opinion of the large majority of the scientific community is that current conditions on Mars; surface
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You might think that critical comments from robots are only saying what they’ve been programmed to say, with no consciousness or feelings of their own. However, new research unveiled that trash-talking droids make human beings sad and unproductive. Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) published their study from its Robotics Institute. Fei Fang, a computer scientist from CMU,
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Aside from the family and the bedroom that we look forward to when going home, sitting on a couch while drinking something gives you a sense of comfort and peace of mind. A glass of wine is one good example. Wines, in general, are alcoholic beverages. However, unlike other liquors, they are made from natural
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San Francisco is a rather excellent tourist destination year-round. Like other coastal West Coast cities in the USA, San Francisco has a temperate climate. The average temperature difference between July (the hottest month) and January (the coldest month) is only 7 degrees Celsius (the average highs between these months range from 10 to 15 degrees
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Cells from a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, a fatal childhood cancer. Lab tests have identified a drug combination that effectively attacks the class of tumours that includes this glioma. Credit: Shawn Gillespie, Monje Lab Cancer 22 November 2019 Mass screening turns up a therapy that holds promise for treating a highly aggressive class of tumours.
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Water vapour over the continental United States is shown in this satellite image from the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. Credit: NOAA/GOES The international agency that regulates global telecommunications agreed to new radio-frequency standards on 21 November. Meteorologists say the long-awaited decision threatens the future of weather forecasting worldwide, by allowing transmissions from mobile-phone
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Poignant and bleak, the critically acclaimed HBO series Chernobyl revisits a difficult chapter in history to tell an important story about the role of science in society. While portions of the plot and characters have been embellished for TV, its an exceptional portrayal of what can happen when a community ignores the signs of an
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Platinum (left) and glassy carbon (right) microelectrodes for deep brain stimulation. (Courtesy: SDSU) Deep brain stimulation (DBS) – in which electrodes implanted in the brain send electrical signals to areas that control movement – is increasingly employed to treat symptoms of movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor or dystonia. It is also used
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This week’s episode focuses on the interface between physics and computing, with deep dives into how artificial intelligence (AI) is contributing to medical physics and how silicon could form the basis of a future quantum computer. First, we hear from Tami Freeman, Physics World’s resident expert on medical physics, about a new positron emission tomography (PET)
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Gold standard: artist’s impression of the disc-shaped photonic switches integrated within an optical circuit. (Courtesy: C. Haffner/NIST) A highly compact, low-energy device capable of switching the paths taken by light within photonic systems has been unveiled by physicists in the US and Switzerland. The new switch could provide a basis for artificial-intelligence (AI) systems that
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Tricky technique: the new glass was made using pulsed laser deposition. (Courtesy: Jonne Renvall and Erkka Frankberg) Flexible glass that does not shatter on impact could soon be made using insights from a study of a glass-like material made from aluminium oxide. Erkka Frankberg at Tampere University in Finland and colleagues have come to this
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